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IUCN/SCC Otter Specialist Group Bulletin
ŠIUCN/SCC Otter Specialist Group

Volume 33(B) Special Issue (April 2016)

Citation: Camp, V.L. (2016). A Bibliography On The North American River Otter Lontra canadensis. Third Edition. IUCN Otter Spec. Group Bull. 33 (B): 3 - 47

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A Bibliography On The North American River Otter Lontra canadensis. Third Edition

Victor L. Camp 1

1Bonita Springs, Florida, USA. e-mail: victorcamp300@gmail.com

Victor L. Camp.  Click for larger image

Originally published August 2013; revised February 2014 as IUCN OSG Bull. 30(A), 2013 (First Edition)
Revised April 2015 as IUCN OSG BUll 32(B), 2015 (Second Edition)

INTRODUCTION

Since retiring to Florida I have had more free time to enjoy the wildlife around me. As I met people and we became acquainted they eventually discovered I was a zoologist. Many of these people were interested in animals and wanted to share their interests and observations. Invariably someone would tell me they saw an otter in the pond, creek or river behind their house. Some told me they saw an otter or two or three walking down a quiet road built next to a drainage ditch, small canal or harbor that is connected to a nearby river. People have seen otters running across two lane roadways or, unfortunately, attempting to cross an interstate highway. Others told me they always see otters in the ponds in their gated community which is a relatively large housing development surrounded by a fence and having restricted access. Golfers told me they saw otters on the golf course. One couple told me about the otter that returned on several occasions to eat the koi in the pond outside their restaurant. As a consequence of these conversations I decided to keep a log of otter sightings. With this relatively prevalent species all around me I considered a number of otter research projects I might undertake where I live near the coast of southwest Florida.

The next step was to gather information on the North American river otter. I did not have access to a library at a major university, and am neither a student nor a faculty member. The literature search was conducted from books and hard copies of scientific articles I had at my immediate disposal and from scientific journal articles published directly online or stored in the extensive online journal storage databases. Literature Cited sections of these articles were reviewed. It was evident an up-to-date bibliography did not exist for Lontra [Lutra] canadensis. I knew the literature search I was conducting would have to be very extensive to satisfy my curiosity. As the bibliography evolved I realized it would be worth sharing when completed.

A conscious decision was made regarding inclusion of articles in the bibliography. The title of many articles did not contain a direct reference to otters and was not included in the bibliography. The title of other articles neither included the scientific name of the North American river otter nor “North American” or “Nearctic” and only made reference to “river otters” or “otters.” When the content of these articles was reviewed and it was evident the article referred to the North American river otter the article was included in the bibliography.

This bibliography was compiled for those undergraduates searching for a graduate research project on the North American river otter and those independent scientists, with an interest in the North American river otter, who do not have access to a library at a major university.

In the 2nd revision (2015) I felt it valuable to include river otter publications listed on the internet as in preparation, press, or review; electronically published (ahead of journal publication); published on a website and of some value (personal opinion); and publications to “watch for.”

In preparing this third revision new and recently discovered publications have been included in two ways. First, an addendum, containing these additional publications, is also presented separately. This allows those individuals, who have created a hardcopy of the bibliography, to simply print out the addendum and add it to their hardcopy. Secondly, the publications in the addendum have been added to the body of the bibliography (this document) for those who wish an updated version or are discovering the bibliography for the first time.

A Bibliography on the North American River Otter (Lontra canadensis)
3rd Edition

Compiled by
Victor L. Camp

Journal Articles | Web Articles | Watch List

JOURNAL ARTICLES

Abram, J.B. and J.R. Lichtenfels. (1974). Larval Eustrongylide ssp.(Nemotoda: Dioctopphyma toidea) from otter (Lutra canadensis) in Maryland. Proceedings of the Helminthological Society of Washington, 41(2): 253.
Addison, E.M., M.A. Strickland, A.B. Stephenson, and J. Hoeve. (1988). Cranial lesions possibly associated with Skrjabingylus (Nematoda: Metastrongyloidea) infections in martens, fishers, and otters. Canadian Journal of Zoology, 66(10): 2155-2159.
Addison, E.M., G.A. Fox, and M. Gilbertson. (eds.). (1991). Proceedings of the expert consultation meeting on mink and otter. March 5 and 6, 1991. Sponsored by Environment Canada and Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources, Windsor, Ontario. 30 pp.
Albeke, S.E., N.P. Nibbelink, L. Mu, and D.J. Ellsworth. (2010). Measuring boundary convexity at multiple spatial scales using a linear “moving window” analysis: an application to coastal river otter habitat selection. Landscape Ecology, 25(10): 1575-1587.
Allen, C.R. (2008). Nebraska reintroduction efforts. The River Otter Journal, XVII(I): 7.
Allen, D. (2010). Otter. Reaktion Books, Ltd., 183pp.
Almonte, C. (2011). The vocal repertoire of captive North American river otters (Lontra canadensis): individual differences and shared repertoires. Ph.D., City University of New York. New York, New York.
Almonte, C. (2014). Classification of captive river otters (Lontra canadensis) vocal repertoires: individual variations and age class comparisons. Animal Behavior and Cognition, 1(4): 502- 517.
Amundson, R. (1950). The Carolina otter. Iowa Conservationist, Des Moines. 9(9): 65, 69, Illus.
Andelt, F. (1988). Unusual movements of river otters released in Nebraska. Prairie Naturalist, 20: 108.
Anderson, E.A. (1982). Status and distribution of the river otter (Lutra canadensis) in Illinois. M.S., Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, Illinois.
Anderson, E.A., and A. Woolf. (1984). River otter (Lutra canadensis) habitat utilization in northwestern Illinois. Final Report. Illinois Department of Conservation. 90 pp.
Anderson, E.A. (1985). River otter management plans: presented to the Division of Forest Resources and Natural Heritage, Illinois Department of Conservation, Springfield, Illinois. Final Report. Southern Illinois University, Cooperative Wildlife Research Laboratory, 201 pages.
Anderson, E.A., and A. Woolf. (1987). River otter food habits in northwestern Illinois. Transactions of the Illinois Academy of Science 80: 115-118.
Anderson, E.A. (1987). Past studies of the river otter (Lutra canadensis) in Illinois. Transactions of the Illinois Academy Science, 80(suppl.): 59.
Anderson, K.L. (1981). Population and reproduction characteristics of the river otter in Virginia and tissue concentrations of environmental contaminants. M.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. Blacksburg, Virginia.
Anderson, K.L. and P.F. Scanlon. (1981)a. Organ weights of river otters. Virginia Journal of Science, 32(3): 86.
Anderson, K.L. and P.F. Scanlon. (1981)b. Heavy metal concentrations in tissues of river otters from Virginia. Virginia Journal of Science, 32(3): 87.
Anderson, K.L. and P.F. Scanlon. (1981)c. Reproduction and population characteristics of river otters in Virginia. Virginia Journal of Science, 32(3): 87.
Anderson-Bledsoe, K.L. and P.F. Scanlon. (1983). Heavy metal concentrations in tissues of Virginia river otters. Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology, 30: 442-447.
Anderson, R.C. (1964). Gnathostoma mryazakii n. sp. from the otter (Lutra canadensis) with comments on G. sociale (Leidy, 1858) of mink (Mustela vison). Canadian Journal of Zoology, 42(2): 249-254.
Andrews, R.D., D.A. Reeved, L.S. Jackson, and W.R. Clark, (1986). Reintroduction of river otters in Iowa. Proceedings of the Iowa Academy of Science, 9391: Abstract 93.
Anonymous. (1857). On the Canadian otter. Canadian Naturalist, 1: 228-232.
Anonymous. (1941)a. Michigan otter still a puzzle. Michigan Conservation, 10(5): 5.
Anonymous. (1941)b. Otter breeding. American Fur Breeder, 14(6): 36.
Anonymous. (1945). Little is known about breeding otters. Fur of Canada, Winnipeg, 10(1): 18.
Anonymous. (1945). Orphan otter found on DeKalb Stream. Outdoor Georgia, Atlanta, 5(30): 7 illus.
Anonymous. (1949). Otter trapped in Chesterfield County, Virginia. Virginia Wildlife, 10(4): 25.
Anonymous. (1984). Reprieve for the river otter. The Otter Raft. p. 7
Arnebeck, B. (2003). Making it through the winter. The River Otter Journal, XII(I): 10-12.
Arnebeck, B. (2004). Encounters between otters (Lontra canadensis) and American beaver (Castor canadensis). IUCN Otter Specialist Group Bulletin, 21(1): 6 pp.
Aulerich, R.J., H.G. Davis, S.J. Bursian, J.G. Sikarskie, and J.N. Stuht. (1995). Suspected thiamine deficiency (Chastek’s paralysis) in northern river otter (Lutra canadensis). Scientifur,
19: 297-304.
Bailey, V. (1909). Otter as a furbearer. Annual Report: American Breeders’ Association, 5: 313-320.
Bailey, V. (1941). The otter. Nature Magazine, 4(4): 237-238, 252.
Baitchman, E.J. and G.V. Kollias. (2000). Clinical anatomy of the North American river otter (Lontra canadensis). Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine, 31(4): 473-483.
Baker, J.L., J.H. Wilson, and P.F. Scanlon, (1982). Flexural strength of otter limb bone. Virginia Journal of Science, 33(3): 66.
Baldwin, E. (2013). Activity patterns, behaviors, and population status of the North American river otter (Lontra canadensis) in a northeast coastal environment, Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts. M.S. Thesis, Antioch University New England. Kenne, New Hampshire.
Balke, J.M.E. (1993)a. River otter predation on juvenile salmonids in winter. A review (Unpublished report, Project 92.8). Ministry of Forests, Victoria, British Columbia.
Balke, J.M.E. ( 1993)b. Preliminary report of river otter scat collection and diet analysis in Queen Charlotte Island, November (1992).and February 1993 (Unpublished report, Project 92.8). Ministry of Forests, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada.
Ballard, K.A., J.G. Sivak, and H.C. Howland. (1989). Intraocular muscles of the Canadian river otter and Canadian beaver and their optical function. Canadian Journal of Zoology, 67(2): 469-474.
Bangs, O. (1898). Description of the Newfoundland otter. Proceedings of the Biological Society of Washington, 12: 35-36.
Barding, E.E. (2011). The recovery of the river otter (Lontra canadensis) in Kentucky: Status, distribution, diet, reproductive characteristics and management of a reintroduced species. Ph.D., University of Kentucky.
Barding, E.E., M.J. Lacki, and L.L. Patton. (2010). Recovery of the river otter in Kentucky. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Southeast Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies, 64: 112-117.
Barding, E.E. and M.J. Lacki. (2012)a. Status, distribution, diet, and reproductive characteristics of river otters in Kentucky. Final Report. Annual Research Highlights 2011. Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources, 5: 26-35.
Barding, E.E. and M.J. Lacki. (2012)b. Winter diets of river otters in Kentucky. Northeastern Naturalist, 19(2): 157-164.
Barding, E.E., and M.J. Lacki. (2014). Demographic and reproductive characteristics of reintroduced river otters in Kentucky: implications for population growth. American Midland Naturalist, 172(2): 338-347.
Barding, E.E and M.J. Lacki. (2015). Occurrence of nematodes (Dracunculus spp.) in reintroduced river otters in Kentucky. Journal of the Kentucky Academy of Science, 75(1-2): 94-96
Barger, N.R. (1950). Otter. Wisconsin Conservation Bulletin, 15: 33.
Barker, I.K. (1991). Non-toxic diseases of mink and otter. p.19: In: Addison, E.M., G.A. Fox, and M. Gilbertson. (eds.). Proceedings of the expert consultation meeting on mink and otter. March 5 and 6, 1991. Sponsored by Environment Canada and Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources. Windsor, Ontario.
Barnston, G. (1863). Remarks on the genus Lutra, and on the species inhabiting North America. Canadian Naturalist and Geologist, 12: 147-188.
Barrett, D. (2008). Status and population characteristics of the northern river otter (Lontra canadensis) in central and eastern Oklahoma. M.S., Oklahoma State University, Stillwater.
Barrett, D.A. and D.M. Leslie, Jr. (2010). Current distribution of river otters in central and eastern Oklahoma, within seven new counties. Occasional Papers of the Museum of Texas Tech University, 294(1): 13 pp.
Barrett, D.A. and D.M. Leslie, Jr. (2012). Spatio-temporal variations in age structures of a partially re- established population of northern river otters (Lontra canadensis). The American Midland Naturalist, 168(2): 302-314.
Bartnicki, P.L. and D.B. Boone. (1989). Special report: status of the river otter (Lutra lutra) in Texas. Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, Austin, Texas.
Base, D.L. (1986). Evaluation of experimental reintroduction of river otters in Oklahoma. Unpublished report, Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation Nongame Wildlife Program, Oklahoma City. 40 pp.
Basu, N., A. Scheuhammer, N. Grochowina, D. Evans, M. O’Brien, and H. Chan. (2005). Effects of mercury on neurochemical receptors in wild river otters (Lontra canadensis). Environmental Science and Technology, 39(10): 3585-3591.
Basu, N., A. Scheuhammer, R. Evans, M. H. O’Brien, and H. Chan. (2007). Cholinesterase and monoamine oxidase activity in relation to mercury levels in the cerebral cortex of wild river otters. Human and Experimental Toxicology, 26: 213-220.
Basu, N., A. Scheuhammer, and M. O’Brien. (2007). Polychlorinated biphenyls, organochlorinated pesticides and polybrominated diphenyl ethers in the cerebral cortex of wild river otters (Lontra canadensis). Environmental Pollution, 149: 25-30.
Bateman, H.L., J.B. Bond, M. Campbell, M. Barrie, G. Riggs, B. Snyder, and W.F. Swanson. (2009). Characterization of basal seminal traits and reproductive endocrine profiles in North American river otters and Asian small-clawed otters. Zoo Biology, 28: 107-126.
Beaver, T.D., G.A. Feldhamer, and J.A. Chapman. (1981). Dental and cranial anomalies in the river otter (Carnivora: Mustelidae). Brimleyana, 7: 101-109.
Beck, D. (1977). Pesticides and heavy metal residues in Louisiana river otter. M.S., Texas A&M University. College Station, Texas.
Beck, T. (1990). River otter recovery program. Job Progress Report. Colorado Division of Wildlife.
Beck, T.D.I. (1992). Development of river otter reintroduction procedures. Colorado Division of Wildlife. Denver, Colorado.
Beck, T.D.I. (1993). River otter reintroduction procedures. Colorado Division of Wildlife. Research Review, 2: 14-16.
Beckel, A.L., (1981). Interactions between bald eagles and North American river otters. Passenger Pigeon, 43(1): 3-4.
Beckel, A.L. (1982). Behavior of free-ranging and captive river otters in northcentral Wisconsin. Ph.D., University of Minnesota. Minneapolis, Minnesota.
Beckel, A.L. (1985). Social grooming in North American river otter. pp. 319-328. In: Andrews, D. and A.M. Herzberg. Data: a collection of problems from many fields for the student and research worker. Springer Series in Statistics.
Beckel, A.L.(1990). Foraging success rates of North American river otters (Lutra canadensis) hunting alone and hunting in pairs. Canadian Field-Naturalist, 104: 586-588.
Beckel, A.L. (1991). Wrestling play in adult river otters (Lutra canadensis). Journal of Mammalogy, 72(2): 386-390.
Beckel-Katz, A.L. (1977). Preliminary observations of the social behavior of the North American river otter. Otters: The Journal of the Otter Trust, 28-32.
Beckwith, S. (2003). Rehabilitation of orphan river otters. pp. 51-60. In: Orendorff, B. (ed.). Wildlife Rehabilitation, Vol. 21. National Wildlife Rehabilitators Association.
Beheler, A.S., J.A. Fike, L.M. Murfitt, O.E. Rhodes, and T.L. Serfass. (2004). Development of polymorphic microsatellite loci for North American river otters (Lontra canadensis) and amplification in related Mustelids. Molecular Ecology Notes, 4(1): 56-58.
Beheler, A.S., J.A. Fike, G. Dharmarajan, O.E. Rhodes, and T.L. Serfass. (2005). Ten new polymorphic microsatellite loci for North American river otters (Lontra canadensis) and their utility in related mustelids. Molecular Ecology Notes, 5: 602-604.
Belanger, M., N. Askin, L. Tan, and C. Wittnich. (2010). The history and current status of otter research within Canada based on peer reviewed journal. IUCN Otter Specialist Group Bulletin, 27(3): 127-133.
Belanger, M., N. Clough, N. Askin, L. Tan, and C. Wittnich. (2011). A Review of Violent or Fatal Otter Attacks. IUCN Otter Specialist Group Bulletin, 28(1): 11-16.
Belant, J.L. (1992). Common loon aggression toward river otters and a beaver. 25 May 1985, Iron County. Passenger Pigeon, 54(3): 233–234.
Belfiore, N.M. (2006). Observation of a beaver beetle (Platypsyllus castoris ritsema) on a North American river otter (Lontra canadensis, Schreber) (Carnivora: Mustelidae: Lutrinae) in Sacramento County, California (Coleoptera: Leiodidae: Platypsyllinae). no access The Coleopterists Bulletin, 60(4): 312-313.
Belfiore, N.M. (2008). Trapping and handling of North American river otters (Lontra canadensis) in a managed marsh. Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine, 39(1): 13-20.
Ben-David, M., R.T. Bowyer, and J.B. Faro. (1996). Niche separation by mink and river otters: Coexistence in a marine environment. Oikos, 75: 41-48.
Ben-David, M., R.T. Bowyer, L.K. Duffy, D.D. Roby, and D.M. Schell. (1998). Social behavior and ecosystem processes: river otter latrines and nutrient dynamics of terrestrial vegetation. Ecology, 79(7): 2567-2571.
Ben-David, M. (2000). Responses of river otters to oil contamination: a captive study. The River Otter Journal, IX(II): 8-9,12.
Ben-David, M, T.M. Williams, and O.A. Ormseth. (2000). Effects of oiling on exercise physiology and diving behavior of river otters: a captive study. Canadian Journal of Zoology, 78(8): 1380- 1390.
Ben-David, M., L.K. Duffy, G.M. Blundell, and R.T. Bowyer. (2001). Natural sure of coastal river otters to mercury: Relation to age, diet, and survival . Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, 20: 1986-1992.
Ben-David, M., L.K. Duffy, and R.T. Bowyer. (2001). Biomarker responses in river otters experimentally exposed to oil contamination. Journal of Wildlife Diseases, 37: 489-508.
Ben-David, M., T. Kondratyuk, B.R. Woodin, P.W. Snyder, and J.J. Stegeman. (2001). Induction of cytochrome P4501A1 expression in captive river otters fed Prudhoe Bay crude oil: evaluation of immunohistochemistry and quantitative RT-PCR. Biomarkers, 6: 218-235.
Ben-David, M. (2002). Can river otters naturally recolonize the Grand Canyon? The River Otter Journal, XI(II).
Ben-David, M, G.M. Blundell, and J.E. Blake. (2002). Post-release survival of river otters: effects of exposure to crude oil and captivity. Journal of Wildlife Management, 66:1208-1223.
Ben-David, M. (2003). Predicting river otter locations with geographic information systems. The River Otter Journal, XII(1): 1-2.
Ben-David, M., H. Golden, M. Goldstein, and I. Martin. (2004). River otters in Prince William Sound and Kenai Fjords National Park: distribution, relative abundance, and minimum population size based on coastal latrine site surveys. Interagency Collaborative Report, Progress Report, Prince William Sound Science Center, Oil Spill Recovery Institute, Cordova, Alaska, USA.
Ben-David, M., G.M. Blundell, J.W. Kern, J.A.K. Maier, E.D. Brown, and S.C. Jewett. (2005). Communication in river otters: creation of variable resource sheds for terrestrial communities. Ecology, 86(5): 1331-1345.
Ben-David, M. (2009). Population survey for river otters in Rocky Mountain National Park. The River Otter Journal, XVII(II): 4-5, 8-9.
Ben-David, M. and H.N. Golden. (2009). River Otters (Lontra canadensis) in south central Alaska: distribution, relative abundance, and minimum population size based on coastal latrine site surveys. SWAN I&M program report, National Park Service. Anchorage, Alaska. 43 pp.
Ben-David, M. (2013). Population survey for river otters in the Rocky Mountain National Park: A progress report for 2012, National Park Service, Rocky Mountain National Park. The River Otter Journal, XXI(II): 1-4.
Bennett, C.H., III. (2014). A predictive habitat model for North American river otter (Lontra canadensis) along low order streams in inland New Jersey. M.S., University of Delaware. Newark, Delaware
Berg, J. (1998). The Diet of Lutra canadensis in the Upper Colorado River System. IUCN Otter Specialist Bulletin, 19A: 8-11.
Berg, J. (1999). Otter slides. The River Otter Journal, XIII(II).
Berg, J.K. (1999). Final report of the river otter research project on the Colorado River Basin and adjacent to the Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado: conducted June 1992 thru June 1997. Presented to Rocky Mountain National Park, West Unit, Grand Lake, Colorado.
Berg, J. (2000). North American river otter diet. The River Otter Journal, IX(II): 4-5.
Berg, W.E. (1982). Reintroduction of fisher, pine marten, and river otter. pp.159-173. In: Sanderson, G.C. (ed.). Midwest Furbearer Management, Proceedings of a Symposium held at the 43rd Midwest Fish and Wildlife Conference, Wichita, Kansas, 7-8 December 1981.
Berg, W.E. and M. DonCarlos. (1996). Pilot otter population trend survey-project proposal: Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. Wildlife Populations Research Unit Annual Report. pp.130-135. In: Blair, J. (ed.). Summaries of Wildlife Research Findings 1996. Berg, W.E. and M. DonCarlos. (1998). Experimental river otter population trend survey. Pp. 99-105. In:B. Joselyn (ed.). Summaries of Wildlife Research Findings, 1998.Section of Wildlife, Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, St. Paul, MN. 177pp.
Bergan, J.F. (1990). Kleptoparasitism of a river otter (Lutra canadensis) by a bobcat (Felis rufus) in South Carolina. Brimleyana, 16: 63-65.
Beringer, J. and J. Blair. (2013). Otter population and harvest trends. pp 18-22. In: 2013 Furbearer program annual report. Missouri Department of Conservation; Resource Science Division
Best, A. (1962). The Canadian otter (Lutra canadensis) in captivity. International Zoo Yearbook, 4: 42- 44.
Beverly, J., and C.L. Elliott. (2006). Prey remains identified in river otter (Lontra canadensis, Schreber) latrines from eastern Kentucky. no access Journal of the Kentucky Academy of Science, 67(2): 125-125.
Bich, J.P. (1988). The feasibility of river otter reintroduction in northern Utah. M.S., Utah State University. Logan, Utah.
Birkenheuer, A.J., C.A. Harms, J. Neel, H.S. Marr, M.D. Tucker, and M.K. Stoskopf. (2007). The identification of a genetically unique piroplasma in North American river otter (Lontra canadensis). Journal of Parasitology, 134(5): 631-635.
Bischof, R. (2003). Status of the northern river otter in Nebraska. Prairie Naturalist, 35: 117-120.
Black, J. M. (2001). Keeping track: the otter records network. Mountains and Rivers: A Quarterly Journal of Natural History for the Klamath-Siskiyou Region, 1: 21-22.
Black, J.M. (2009). River otter monitoring by citizen science volunteers in northern California: Social groups and litter Size. Northwestern Naturalist, 90(2): 130-135.
Blaisdell, F. (1999). Rehabilitation of river otters. pp. 1-5. In: Orendorff, B. (ed.). National Wildlife Rehabilitators Association Quarterly Journal, 17(2).
Blajeski, A., L.K. Duffy, and R.T. Bowyer. (1996). Differences in faecal profiles of porphyrins among river otters exposed to the Exxon Valdez oil spill. Biomarkers, 1: 262-266.
Bluett, R. (1984). The river otter. Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, Bureau of Wildlife Management, Madison, Wisconsin.
Bluett, R. (ed.). (1995). Illinois river otter recovery plan. Illinois Department of Natural Resources, Springfield, Illinois.
Bluett, R.D., E.A. Anderson, G.F. Hubert, G.W. Kruse, and S.E. Lauzon. (1999). Reintroduction and status of the river otter (Lutra canadensis) in Illinois. Transactions of the Illinois Academy of Science, 92(1 and 2): 69-78.
Bluett, R.D., C.K. Nielson, R.W. Gottfried, C.A. Miller, and A. Woolf. (2004). Status of the river otter (Lontra canadensis) in Illinois, 1998-2004. Transactions of the Illinois State Academy of Science, 97: 209-217.
Blundell, G. (1997). 1996 annual report near-shore vertebrate predator project: River otters. University of Alaska. Fairbanks, Alaska.
Blundell, G.M., J.W. Kern, R.T. Bowyer, and L.K. Duffy. (1999). Capturing river otters: a comparison of Hancock and leg-hold traps. Wildlife Society Bulletin, 27(1): 184-192.
Blundell, G.M, R.T. Bowyer, M. Ben-David, T.A. Dean, and S.C. Jewett. (2000). Effects of food resources on spacing behavior of river otters: does forage abundance control home-range size? pp. 325-333. In: Eiler, J.H and A.D. Neuman. (eds.). Biotelemetry 15: Proceedings of the 15th International Symposium on Biotelemetry. Juneau, Alaska, USA, May 1999. Wageningen, The Netherlands: International Society on Biotelemetry.
Blundell, G.M. (2001). Social organization and spatial relationships in coastal river otters: assessing form and function of social groups, sex-biased dispersal, and gene flow. Ph.D., University of Alaska, Fairbanks.
Blundell, G.M., S.C. Jewett, T.A. Dean, and R.T. Bowyer. (2001). An experiment of simulated predation: can river otters become food limited in a marine system? pp. 5-9. In: Jewett, S.C. (Ed.). Cold Water Diving for Science. American Academy of Underwater Sciences, 21st Annual Scientific Diving Symposium. University of Alaska Sea Grant, AK-SG-01-06, 98 pp.
Blundell, G.M., J.A.K. Maier, and E.M. Debevec. (2001). Linear home ranges: effects of smoothing, sample size, and autocorrelation on kernel estimates. Ecological Monographs, 71: 469-489. Blundell, G. (2002). Why do river otters inhabiting marine environments live in groups? The River Otter Journal, XI(I).
Blundell, G., M. Ben-David, and R.T. Bowyer. (2002). Sociality in river otters: cooperative foraging or reproductive strategies? Behaviorial Ecology, 13(1): 134-141.
Blundell, G.M., M. Ben-David, P. Groves, R.T, Bowyer, and E. Geffen. (2002). Characteristics of sex-biased dispersal and gene flow in coastal river otters: implications for natural re-colonization of extirpated populations. Molecular Ecology, 11(3): 289-303.
Blundell, G.M., M. Ben-David, P. Groves, R.T. Bowyer, and E. Geffen. (2004). Kinship and sociality in coastal river otters: Are they related? Behavioral Ecology, 15(5): 705-714.
Boege-Tobin, D.D. (2005). Ranging patterns and habitat utilization of northern river otters (Lontra canadensis) in Missouri: implications for the conservation of a reintroduced species. Ph.D., University of Missouri-St. Louis. Saint Louis, Missouri.
Bohrman, J.A. (2011). Evaluating river otter (Lontra canadensis) translocation success: post-release monitoring via olfactory attractants and inter-peritoneal transmitters, and local anglers attitudes. M.S., Frostburg State University. Frostburg, Maryland.
Bohrman, J.A., S.S. Stevens, and T.L. Serfass. (2012). Long-term survival and reproduction in a North American river otter (Lontra canadensis) with an intraperitoneal radio-transmitter. Canadian Field-Naturalist, 125(3): 252-254.
Bohrman, J. (2012)a. Rehabilitated otters take to the wilds of Texas. The River Otter Journal, XIX(I): 5.
Bohrman, J. (2012)b. Yellowstone’s otters are no match for invasive lake trout. The River Otter Journal, XIX(I): 8.
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ARTICLES OF INTEREST REFERENCED ONLINE
(as of 15 April 2016)

Publications in Preparation, Press, or Review

Fike, J.A., T.L. Serfass, and O.E. Rhodes, Jr. Assessment of genetic structure of river otter populations in Eastern North America. Cannot confirm a publication as of 15 April 2016 (VLC).
Fike, J,A., E.K. Latch, O.E. Rhodes, Jr., and T.L. Serfass. Influence of time and temperature on amplification and genotyping error of DNA derived from river otter fecal material. Cannot confirm a publication as of 15 April 2016 (VLC).
Fike, J.A., T.L. Serfass, A.S. Beheler, and O.E. Rhodes, Jr. Evaluation of preservation methods for DNA analysis of river otter scat: Probability of amplification and genotyping accuracy. Proceedings of the XI International Otter Colloquium. Cannot confirm article is in this publication (VLC).
Latch, E.K. D.G. Scognamillo, J.A. Fike, and O.E. Rhodes, Jr. Fine scale population structure of coastal and upland populations of river otters in Louisiana. Cannot confirm a publication as of 15 April 2016 (VLC).

Electronic Publications (ahead of journal publication)

Albeke, S.E., N.P. Nibbelink, and M. Ben-David, (2015). Modeling behavior of coastal river otter (Lontra canadensis) in response to prey availability in Prince William Sound, Alaska: A spatially-explicit individual-based approach. PLoS ONE 10, e0126208.doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0126208.
Timm-Davis L.L, T.J. DeWitt, and C.D. Marshal. (2015). Divergent skull morphology supports two trophic specializations in otters (Lutrinae). PLoS ONE 10 (12): e0143236.doi:10,1371/journal.pone.014323 

Publications on Websites

Aarden, K., Dethier, M., & Dobkowski, K. (2014). Spring Diet of river otters (Lontra canadensis) in the San Juan Islands of Washington State. 9 pages. University of Washington, ResearchWorks, Friday Harbor Laboratories Student Research Papers, University of Washington, Friday Harbor, Washington.
Access: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/27248
Arnebeck, B. (2011)
. Otter behavior: the way otters do things or not do things.
Access: http://bobarnebeck.com/
Arnebeck, B. (unk). New York State’s campaign against otters.
Access: http://bobarnebeck.com/
Black, J. M. (2000). River otter demography study: a citizen science project. Humboldt State University web site.
Access: http://www2.humboldt.edu/wildlife/faculty/black/research/otters.html
Bottini, M. (2009). The status and distribution of the river otter (Lontra canadensis) on Long Island, New York. 26 pp.
Access: http://www.peconic.org/
Friis-Bastaad, E. (2015). Keeping Yukon’s river otters in the swim. Your Yukon, Yukon Research Center, Access: http://yukoncollege.yk.ca/downloads/YY_Final_otter_Jan_9_2015 
Gyug, L. (ed.). (2008)
. Species-Habitat model; for northern river otter.
Access: https://www.for.gov.bc.ca/hfd/library/FIA/2008/LBIP_4765001h.pdf
Kolba, Nikolai. (2015). Babesia spp in North American river otter (Lontra canadensis), Beavers (Castor canadensis), muskrats (Odontra zibethicus), and mink (Neovison vison) in Pennsylvania and New Jersey. Northeast Wildlife DNA Lab.
Access: http://quantum.esu.edu/dna/research/prevalence-of-babesia-spp-infection-in-aquatic-mammals-in-pa-and-nj/
Maddox, C. and V. Vrable. (unk). Houston Zoo: North American river otter Latrine site survey. An AAZK Conservation, Restoration and Preservation Grant Project, 7pp.
Access: https://aazk.org/wp-content/uploads/grant_river_otter_survey.pdf
Shannon, J.S. (2001). Ontogeny of behavior and self sufficiency in free-ranging otters.
Access: http://www.otters.net/
Shannon, J.S. (2002). The origin of “River Otter”.
Access: http://www.otters.net/
Shannon, J.S. (2005). How I identify individual otters.
Access: http://www.otters.net/
Shannon, J.S. (2007). J. David Solf-Otter research pioneer.
Access: http://www.otters.net/
Shannon, J.S. (2008). Research abstract.
Access: http://www.otters.net/

WATCH FOR THESE PUBLICATIONS

Melquist, W., S. Kempema, and E.D. Stukel. (2014?). Determination of River Otter (Lontra canadensis ) Distribution and Evaluation of Potential Sites for Population Expansion in South Dakota. The Wildlife Society, South Dakota Chapter, Annual Meeting, 24-26 February 2014.
Mowry, R., Schneider, T., Latch, E., Gompper, M., Beringer, J., and L.S. Eggert. Genetic restoration lags demographic restoration in reintroduced river otters. Animal Conservation. This article may be synonymous with the authors’ 2015 publication entitled “Genetics and the successful reintroduction of the Missouri river otter.” Animal Conservation18(2): 196-206. (above)

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